Louis Poulsen PH Artichoke

Louis Poulsen PH Artichoke

The fixture provides 100% glare-free light. The 72 precisely placed blades form 12 unique rows of 6 blades each. They illuminate the fixture, but also emit diffused light, creating a unique pattern. Reflection from the light source is diffused to the sandblasted lower surfaces, and that light is decoratively reflected to the upper surfaces, making the fixture shine in a special way. The glass tops are treated to prevent direct glare. In the case of the energy-efficient LED variant, the quality of light and atmosphere surrounding the luminaire has been kept at the highest level.

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The glass version of the PH Artichoke dates back to the period 1927-1931, when Poul Henningsen designed a glass pendant lamp called PH Septima - a pendant lamp with seven screens. This fixture was produced by Louis Poulsen until 1940, but then disappeared from the range due to the lack of suitable materials during the war. When Poul Henningsen was asked in 1958 to design a fixture for the Langelinie Pavilion restaurant, he completed the task within three months, as the PH Artichoke is based on the same principles as the PH Septima. The PH Septima consisted of seven screens of clear glass with six sandblasted surfaces. With the PH Artichoke, the screens were divided into trellises - as Poul Henningsen called them - and the fixture was made of copper. With its handmade, sandblasted glass, the PH Artichoke Glass has a similar look to the PH Septima. The soft light is scattered through the blades, providing a pleasant and diffused light. Whether turned on or off, the fixture has an "ice-like" appearance that lends elegance and lightness to any space.